Recently @equine.rampaige on Instagram drew Jim and I. It was after our last Western Dressage show and I really wanted a drawing that showcased his beauty. She surpassed any expectation I had! Along with shedding a few pounds from me (Thank you!!), she captured Jim perfectly. I didn’t have to give her much direction either, she just knew. All of the comments on her Instagram were about being so happy a western dressage rider had been drawn! I’ll be finding a special spot for this on the blog soon!

 

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My post show routine

After a busy day at a show, your horse is tired, you’re tired. Everything is a mess. You have your tack still in the trailer. Your show bag is full of hay from where your horse dripped pieces from his hay bag into it. Your show numbers are still attached to a bridle or a show jacket. Pretty much, it’s utter chaos.

We spend so much time before the show to get ready and so much energy AT the show that no one feels like cleaning up afterward. It takes enough of your energy to make sure both horse and items get back to the barn OK that nothing else matters.

This past Sunday, my husband and I packed up our stuff and Jim and went off to a dressage show. Afterward I ran off to a late night at work and Thomas went home to crash after not sleeping. My schedule for the next morning? Post show routine.

Getting to the barn, I checked on Jim first. He was exhausted. The night before a thunderstorm had rolled through and I swear he didn’t get any sleep. Spa day! Perfect for post show days.

But before I could do anything with him, I had to unpack the trailer. Not only is promptly unpacking the trailer important, but it’s respectful to your fellow barn mates and trainer. They will need that trailer for another show – one you may not be going to – and it’s only polite to get all of your stuff out so when it comes time, others can put their stuff in. Otherwise it would become one big mess and no one would be able to find anything!

I have a system for trailer unpacking. Doing multiple trips back and forth, I work on getting everything from the trailer to my tack trunk. I don’t care where it goes at this point, just the act of getting all of the items in one spot helps! Then it’s hanging up the saddles, pads and bridles and putting brushes, lunge equipment and other things away. Show numbers get immediately put in the show bag for future shows since many of them make you reuse your number for the season!

Once everything is away, I could focus on Jim. Pampering days are some of my favorite. I break out all of my brushes – curry comb, hard brush, soft brush, flicker brush, face curry comb, face brush, mane and tail comb, hoof pick – and I go at it. Polish up with some hoof dressing, rebraid his tail and put it up in his Tail Boot.

Then I wrapped him up in his Back on Track mesh sheet. My next BOT purchase needs to be the quick wraps. That would make for some extra special spa days! Putting Jim away, the biggest thank you was watching him lay down and fall asleep – so peaceful and so comfortable. Spa days are my way to say thank you to him – thanks for performing your best and being my partner.

Spring has come to New England and with it, we prepare for the biggest battle we equestrians face: flies.

Just last week, I spotted my first bee of 2019. Gnats are beginning to beat their wings. My husband is finding baby spiders in his car. We must be ready.

Last week, I purchased my first few bottles of fly spray for Jim. Tucking one in my tack trunk, I hung the other on his stall for easy use and for turnout. (I have a great bottle holder that hangs on my blanket bar that comes in handy!) My barn owner looked at me as if I was crazy; being so prepared. But the fact of the matter is, it’s not a bad thing to be prepared for.

Some horses are very sensitive to bug bites. Although not overly reactive, Jim can be prone to hives from some bites and he is not a fan of bugs in his face or ears while riding. My secret weapon when it comes to fly spray is the Pyranha products. I especially like their aerosol for good coverage that lasts and really works. It goes for anywhere from $16-22 a bottle and does not make your horse’s coat too slick before a ride.

When it comes to riding, Jim often sports a fly mask or a fly bonnet. This year, my husband and I got new LeMieux sets in plum and midnight. I can’t wait to try them out! I am shopping for a new fly mask this year. I’ve had my current one for almost 2 years and it’s time to change it up. I did like my old one though which was the Absorbine Ultrashield.

For fly sheets, you can’t beat the quality of Schneider’s. I own both their Mosquito Mesh sheet with a neck and their Interlock Mesh sheet. The interlock is slightly heavier of a material, but has great UV protection which is wonderful when you have a black horse and don’t want him to bleach! The mosquito mesh is lighter and really good for those especially hot summer days.

The next thing on my checklist? Start throwing winter blankets into the wash and take my fly sheets out of storage. I was smart and put them away clean so they’ll be all set to break out and use this year. I like to slowly rotate my winter blankets out of use as the weather warms up. The heavyweights are already in the wash and the mediumweights will be going soon. Eventually his turnout sheets will hit the wash too, but with the amount of mud he enjoys kicking up while playing – it won’t be for awhile.

It’s the end of March and before you know it, those flies will be buzzing around our heads and in our hair once again. Don’t let them catch you off guard!

As a sport, we are surrounded by judging. We are judged for how we look. We are judged for how our horses look. We are judged for how we ride. But in the midst of all of that judging, we should be doing more supporting.

Statistics around rates of depression, anxiety and suicide are terrifying. It’s almost impossible to find someone that hasn’t been affected in some way by an issue with mental health. You can’t see depression from how someone is dressed. You don’t know that they’ve considered suicide from how successful or unsuccessful their ride was. You have no idea if they’re going through an anxiety attack by the brand of their show jacket.

No, you can’t “solve” them. One interaction may not lift all of their thoughts of suicide out of their mind. One saying won’t cure them of depression. But a kind word can soothe.

We as equestrians don’t do enough cheering. We are so focused on how we did that we don’t always look to the other girl in the lineup and say you did a good job. We don’t often help one another in the warm up arena as everyone is trying to navigate a ring of chaos. We don’t always try and lift each other up so everyone can do well and feel accomplished.

Yes, our sport may be about judging, but we compete to also have fun. It isn’t particularly fun to come in last every class or feel utterly defeated by a ride. What is fun, though, is being told by another competitor that they liked your shirt or that your pivot turn in a showmanship class rocked. Maybe you had a fantastic rein back in the line up. Or maybe your horse was extra shiny that day. Little comments count.

So I challenge you, fellow equestrians, just as I challenge myself. Make someone smile. Help another with their 20m dressage circle or just tell them you love their horse. Instead of just saying “maybe next time,” tell them something positive. Lift them up. Although you can’t solve everyone’s mental health issues, maybe just that kind comment keeps it at bay for a moment. It might give someone just that little bit of relief and positivity that they need to hear. You can make a difference.

A winter of work

It’s been a long, dreary winter. In New England, we have had the strangest few months – with small storms bringing freezing cold and ice amid mild temperatures. I think I have become a pro on the “penguin walk” across sheets of ice both at home and at the barn. We haven’t had tons of snow this year, mostly just ice and freezing rain. Where we board Jim we very fortunately have an indoor arena. I know a lot of equestrians are not blessed with an indoor, but it is definitely worth it when it comes to New England weather.

At the start of the winter back in November, we placed Jim in training 2 days a week with our barn owner. We had a few specific short-term goals along with some long-term goals for our 2019 show season and beyond. Our short-term goals included a complete rework of how we lunge Jim. A year ago, our lunging consisted of a horse who liked to tear around like an idiot, burst out from you when you sent him out, and a horse that tried to break away from you when you went to change the chain set up while changing directions.

Another goal was to teach Jim how to balance himself both while lunging and under saddle. Although very broke, he liked to throw his nose up in the air and go way above the vertical. He rode very hollow and was very heavy on the forehand. He didn’t have much of a concept of engaging his hindquarters and stepping through.

Traffic was another key that Jim needed some work. He can work very nicely around other horses, but sometimes, oh sometimes, those ears went back and the attitude came out. With show season quickly approaching again, that wasn’t going to cut it – especially when it comes to warm up arenas.

Another smaller goal was to put some showmanship and ground handling buttons on him. He actually knows quite a lot in this department, but there’s some finishing work to be done.

And we have our long-term goals which include expanding our dressage knowledge, putting a flying change on him and working on more lateral work.

It’s been four months of training. We have had our setbacks and we have had some amazing progress. I actually love watching Jim learn. He sometimes takes a week or so and has a setback, but once it’s over, comes back even stronger.

One of our main goals – lunging – has come a long way. While it’s not perfect and probably will never be since some of it is just him, we can handle him much better and lunging has turned into teaching moments and not just “go run around like an idiot.” He’s actually not allowed to canter on the lunge line. Lunging work is for paying attention and working his brain. He’s taken to the new lunging rules very well.

Another goal that is coming along nicely is Jim learning how to balance himself. He has actually started to consistently round (when I use my legs!) He’s begun to understand what we are asking of him. He has also muscled up a lot. I can’t wait to take some new conformation photos in the spring!

While we still have some goals in the works, I’m very happy about our winter progress. But the most important part is how much fun we have been having with him. He lights up our life. From letting us put gloves on his ears and take funny photos to how much enjoyment we get riding and pampering and loving him, he has become part of the family. Having fun is what our sport is all about. If you’re not having fun, your passion will die. Every time you go to the barn and every time you put a foot in the stirrup, you should enjoy what you’re doing. The confidence we have been gaining (especially me) working with Jim has been fantastic. And I have my village to thank who are there for us all along the way.

Months back when my husband and I were on a trip, we stayed at a little B&B that had a barn attached to it. In the mornings, the B&B let us saunter down to the barn to greet the Tennessee Walkers they had. We got to know two of the boarders and one morning, one of them was opening a box from SmartPak.

Along with multiple things inside, she was most excited about her Haas brushes. I had maybe seen them once or twice, but never thought much of them. They’re not cheap and I didn’t understand what the fuss was about.

Fast forward back to January. I wanted them. I had found the black horse set they sell on their German website. But in foreign currency and shipping them to the U.S., they would be expensive. Also I didn’t understand why I needed 5 brushes for one grooming! Instead, I found 3 critical brushes on the SmartPak site that were included in the black horse set- the Curry Comb, the Lipizzaner and the Diva Exclusive.

(Photos courtesy of Smartpakequine.com)

Now these brushes aren’t cheap. The curry is $6, the Lipizzaner is $40 and the Diva Exclusive is $32. You may ask, why is it worth buying that expensive of brushes? After using them twice so far, I understand.

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Now granted, Jim is a show horse. He’s kept inside and blanketed. He’s worked throughout the entire winter with a strict routine. He has a very balanced nutrition program including DAC Oil and I also spray him down with Equifuse’s Shine Spray about once every week to two weeks. And I seriously need to be able to bathe him when it’s warm again and get those stockings clean! But when I picked up those brushes, even that thin layer of dirt and dead hair brushed away.

The curry comb is part curry and part shedder. Since it’s almost spring, Jim has already been losing small fine hairs. The curry took things out of his coat that I had no idea they were there! It is a firm curry, but Jim seemed to like it.

The Lipizzaner is a good medium brush. It picked up all of the hair the curry left behind. It’s comfortable to use in your hand and you get a very nice grooming stroke from it. But my favorite of the 3 brushes is the Diva Exclusive.

The Diva sports lambs wool in the center of it. It’s almost softer than my cat! It’s lined with black horse hairs on the outside to give it lift and structure and damn does it work! It’s my favorite polishing/finishing brush ever. It’s going to be perfect come show season for getting that extra little bit of shine to come through. (And that can be difficult on a black horse!)

Another cool part about Haas is they have a chestnut, a gray, and a universal set as well as the black horse set. It’s not just a marketing ploy – they do cater the brushes to the coat types. Grays you need that extra pull from urine stains, chestnuts usually have a very sensitive/thin skin, and black horses love their deep clean grooming! If you’re like me and cannot afford the full set, find some reviews and see which brushes come in the set and choose the ones for you.

I know my husband will kill me for it, but I’m addicted to these brushes. They were a birthday gift and I’m so glad they were! Now I need a nice handy bag to keep them safe in.

(Note: I received these brushes from a non-horse family member for my birthday!)

It’s January and it’s time to sit down and collect our goals for the year. Most equestrians only have to focus on their personal goals and what they’d like their year to look like. In the case of being 1/2 of an equestrian couple, it’s a team effort.

Decisions such as what classes are we doing this year are broken down into “which ones can one person enter and which ones can the other?” Is one of us ready to move up a division and the other one stay in the same or are we both moving up? And it varies by show series. Some show series have certain classes while others don’t. Will I be the one to take Jim into the in hand classes or will my husband? Will he take him into Western Halter while I take him into English Halter? It goes on and on.

That’s on top of our usual personal goals and where we would like to see our riding this year. Luckily, him and I see very eye to eye on one thing with Jim: dressage. He tried dressage with Jim last year after I was ranting and raving about loving it. Now he’s just as hooked. Having dressage (both traditional and western) as one of our goals actually makes life easier since we can perform different tests. The trick is not performing more than allowed since some show series have rules on how many tests one horse can do at a single show.

Beside dressage this year, we set our eyes on one thing: our first overnight show. We took our budget from smaller shows last year and compiled it to focus on one, big September show – the New England Pinto Horse Association show in September. It will be the first time we have gone to a multi-day show where we don’t have to show off of our trailer. We set aside our vacation days from work for before and after so the horse show hangover won’t be so bad! And with it being in September, we have plenty of time to perfect our rides and train for it. Luckily we have trainers with us who support us in this goal and are ready to help us get there!

The show season begins early for us this year with a dressage show kick off in March (and maybe even a show before that!) I know we are ready and going to have so much fun this year because I can’t imagine anything more fun in the world than showing alongside my best friend and my horse.

A friend shared an old George Morris quote recently about how kids these days don’t learn enough about the work behind horses. They may learn to ride or the mechanics, but they don’t get the down and dirty work that actually goes into taking care of your horse.

My experience growing up with horses was very different than many who had the funds. My parents paid for every other week lessons for me. (So 2 a month) But for a horse crazy middle schooler, that wasn’t enough. The barn I was at allowed me to work to get extra free rides and work I did.

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(12-year-old Kaitlyn with a lesson horse who taught me a LOT.)

My parents would drop me off at the barn early in the morning on Saturdays – or really any day I could wiggle out of them. Reporting in to our barn owner, me and any other girls doing the same thing would get a list of chores to complete. We did everything from turning the horses out in the morning (many of which were show-level Arabians that REALLY wanted out!) to shoveling pile after pile of shavings from the shavings pile into our wheelbarrows and then to the stalls.

Since we were kids, we would get the jobs no one else wanted. We got to de-ice and clean buckets in the middle of winter (when you then had to decide if it was worth wearing wet gloves or being cold.) We would lug the hoses out to the fields to fill the water buckets (and remember to take them in!) We would clean tack, groom horses, and really anything that our small selves could do.

It wasn’t just the lesson barn either. For about a year in high school, I volunteered at a therapeutic riding center. Did I ride? Once. Did I do a lot of mucking out the paddock, grooming horses, side walking and leading horses for lessons? Yes. Did I love every minute and every smile and change over each rider that would come through? 100% yes.

I didn’t realize it at the time, but I now realize how important that experience was for me as an equestrian. I knew the hard work behind the horses. I had to – or else I couldn’t ride. I had to earn that one little half hour that I could walk/trot/canter around on my own. My ride was the reward of putting the hard work into taking care of these beautiful creatures.

Even now, I’m still a barn rat. On the weekends, I do chores with my husband to help pay the bills. On Fridays, on my day off from work, I’m frequently found at the barn. My duties may have changed now that I have my own horse, but I’ll still be found holding horses for the chiropractor because my barn owner was needed with another horse or helping our barn manager toss hay at mealtimes. I’ll still be in the lounge cleaning my tack. And I still enjoy every moment. I cherish every second of taking care of the horses. I know the work behind the reward.

Horse showing may be about riding, but being an equestrian and a horsewoman is about taking care of them too.

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It’s not hard to find the matches to your riding socks in your drawer with the Dreamer & Schemers riding socks. I have fallen head over tail in love with these socks!

(Screecher decided he wanted to be in the photo.)

I bought my first pair of Dreamer & Schemers a few months ago after I had followed their Instagram for a contest. Their vibrant colors and trendy designs caught me immediately. The designs were totally me and they had something for everyone – whether you like unicorns, jumper designs, avocados, sushi, etc. The list went on and on. I have even gotten my friends hooked on them!

Along with being very fun designs with a personality of their own, the D&S socks feel great. They have a nice black sock bottom that’s smooth and comfortable in your boots. At the top is a stretchy black band that helps keep your socks up. They’re quality.

(Doesn’t the black horse look like Jim?)

The socks fit up to a 16″ calf. I run about a 16″ and although they do get a bit snug over breeches, they do fit. I tend to be that weird short person who hates ankle bunching with the bottom of my breeches so I tend to wear my socks under my breeches with my half chaps. (P.S.- If anyone has a solution to this, PLEASE hit me up on my contact info on the blog or comment below!)

The socks usually run about $17 although she runs sales pretty consistently. Right now they’re $15 with a buy 3, get 1 free deal. She also works with companies to do custom socks so if you go by the View Halloo site or some of your friendly tack shops or bloggers, you might find some limited editions!

The socks are stylish, comfortable and a good buy for the price. I’ve already gotten a few friends hooked on them! (And some of them don’t even ride English!)

(Disclaimer: I bought these socks myself!)

There’s one thing in horse ownership that you come to learn and appreciate more than ever: your farrier. Finding a good farrier is like finding that one perfect foundation for your skin tone – almost impossible. When you find them, you hold on tight.

A horse’s hooves are their foundations. Think: horses spend almost their entire 24 hours a day on their feet minus a few hours laying down to sleep. Those hooves carry 1,000+ pounds a day on capsules of tissue, blood and bone. Keeping their feet balanced and correct is a true art and one not enough equestrians appreciate.

I’m sorry backyard owners, I will never pick up a rasp and try and trim my horse’s feet myself. Nope, never ever. I value his feet and everything that goes into them. There is too much at stake and it’s worth the money every 6 to 8 weeks.

I have become very good at recognizing trouble signs. I know the basic signs of thrush, white line disease, flares, chips and abscesses. I know a nail in the foot is an immediate call to the farrier and the vet! I know enough of when to call my farrier and say “come save me.”

Think of all of the diseases that are potentially life threatening – or at least career ending – that show signs of trouble in the hoof; laminitis, navicular, broken coffin bones and many more. An incorrect balance on the feet can also affect the horse’s entire body. You don’t mess with that alone.

It comes down to the fact that I’m ok that my horse has a love affair with my farrier. He should because in the end, it’s better for everyone. It’s worth the money to have a qualified farrier who knows what he’s doing taking care of my horse’s feet. He’s not just some guy who decided there’s money in blacksmithing and wants to run around and call himself a farrier.

When looking for a new farrier, don’t be afraid to shop around. Ask other horse owners who they use. Ask who they won’t use. Gather as much information about the blacksmith as you can. And if your farrier isn’t cutting it, don’t be afraid to find a new one. You can find the right fit for you and your horse, but don’t be surprised if he/she isn’t the cheapest on the block. A good farrier is worth it.